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4/10/13

Honey May Be a Sweet Way to Help a Cough Say Some Medical Studies

HONEY FOR A COUGH? SOME MEDICAL REPORTS SAY YES BUT ABSOLUTELY NOT FOR INFANTS BECAUSE OF BOTULISM




YOU HAVE A HACKING COUGH AND WHEN YOU SIT AT A TABLE PEOPLE GET UP AND MOVE WHAT TO DO? MAYBE HONEY






Coughing can really get on your nerves especially if it's you doing the coughing. Sitting in a packed waiting room with other people at a medical clinic there's a good chance that some of your compatriots are there because they are coughing. So, what do you do for coughing? It depends. Cough can be due to a whole gamut of things that run the spectrum from allergies and the common cold to reflux, asthma and heart failure.






There have been a few medical research papers that point to honey as a putative cough helper. An Israeli study said "In a randomized controlled trial we compared 3 types of honey versus placebo ( a placebo is a simulated or otherwise medically ineffectual treatment)of upper respiratory tract infection-associated cough. These types of honey were superior to placebo in alleviating cough." Another study said "significant differences in symptom improvement were detected between treatment groups with honey consistently scoring the best and no treatment scoring the worst". Both of these studies asked parents to rate honey versus other things to help with cough. Again EVERYONE SAYS DO NOT GIVE HONEY TO INFANTS because of the chance of botulism.


The common cold (vs the uncommon cold?) is probably one of the most frequent causes of cough. There are a variety of over the counter and by prescription cough medications including dextromethorphan, which often shows up in medicines with DM in their name and also prescription meds including non narcotic pills that reduce the cough reflex as well as narcotic cough syrup with codeine that is believed to work on the cough control in the brain.


Botulism is poisoning that results from the toxin of a bacteria called Clostridium botulinum. "Infant botulism results from the ingestion of the C. botulinum spores, and subsequent colonization of the small intestine...Honey is the only known dietary reservoir of C. botulinum spores linked to infant botulism."


Effect of Honey on Nocturnal Cough and Sleep Quality: A Double-blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Study

Effect of honey, dextromethorphan, and no treatment on nocturnal cough and sleep quality for coughing children and their parents


Cough and Cold Remedies for the Treatment of Cough in..

Codeine and Cough: An Ineffective Gold Standard