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6/22/11

NEW DOCTORS TASK FORCE RECOMMENDATIONS ON HOW MUCH VITAMIN D FOUR VIDEOS ABOUT VITAMIN D AND COULD VITAMIN D HAVE ROLE IN HEART DISEASE AND CANCER PREVENTION

NEW DOCTORS TASK FORCE RECOMMENDATIONS ON HOW MUCH VITAMIN D FOUR VIDEOS ABOUT VITAMIN D AND COULD VITAMIN D HAVE ROLE IN HEART DISEASE AND CANCER PREVENTION


A task force of doctors has announced Vitamin D recommendations. The study in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism concluded, "considering that vitamin D deficiency is very common in all age groups and that few foods contain vitamin D, the task force recommended supplementation at suggested daily intake and tolerable upper limit levels, depending on age and clinical circumstances".





The Task Force also suggested the measurement of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level by a reliable assay as the initial diagnostic test in patients at risk for deficiency. Treatment with either vitamin D2 or vitamin D3 was recommended for deficient patients. (see link below)

I have written posts in Purple Medical Blog previously about the seemingly accumulating evidence that Vitamin D may do a lot more than we thought.I have brought together here videos about Vitamin D and the recommendations about it for kids and adults.

Video About Vitamin D and Kids Click the Arrow





I n the past in Purple Medical Blog I've talked about the Canadian Cancer Society recommendation that many people take Vitamin D and scoped out a report that said that women with breast cancer who had low levels of Vitamin D did less well prognosis wise. Even a study that said "Low levels of 25(OH)D (Vitamin D) are associated with higher risk of myocardial infarction (heart attack) in a graded manner, even after controlling for factors known to be associated with coronary artery disease" (heart problems related to the coronary arteries that supply the heart muscle itself with blood).



At a news conference about the task force recommendations,Michael Holick, MD, PhD, of Boston University, who chaired the guideline committee, said that "serum levels above 30 ng/mL have long been an acceptable target, although he said clinicians should strive for a target between 40 and 60 ng/mL". "Adults ages 19 to 50 should get at least 600 IU per day, although, again, higher doses -- up to 1,500 to 2,000 IU a day -- may be necessary to get levels consistently above 30 ng/ml. Patients ages 50 to 70 should get 600 IU a day, and those above than 70 need 800 IU, with the same caveat as in younger adults for increased doses to achieve higher levels".

  • Evaluation, Treatment, and Prevention of Vitamin D Deficiency: an Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline

    According to the American Academy of Pediatrics "Adequate vitamin D throughout childhood may reduce the risk of osteoporosis. In adults, new evidence suggests that vitamin D plays a role in the immune system and may help prevent infections, autoimmune diseases, cancer and diabetes". Vitamin D for Adults Watch A VideoClick the Arrow





    "We are doubling the recommended amount of vitamin D children need each day because evidence has shown this could have life-long health benefits," said Frank Greer, MD, FAAP, chair of the AAP Committee on Nutrition and co-author of the report. “Supplementation is important because most children will not get enough vitamin D through diet alone.”

    Watch this video about a possible relationship between Vitamin D and cancer Click the arrow to start



    "Breastfeeding is the best source of nutrition for infants. However, because of vitamin D deficiencies in the maternal diet, which affect the vitamin D in a mother’s milk, it is important that breastfed infants receive supplements of vitamin D,” said Carol Wagner, MD, FAAP, member of the AAP Section on Breastfeeding Executive Committee and co-author of the report. “Until it is determined what the vitamin D requirements of the lactating mother-infant dyad are, we must ensure that the breastfeeding infant receives an adequate supply of vitamin D through a supplement of 400 IU per day.”



    "The new AAP recommendations include:

  • Breastfed and partially breastfed infants should be supplemented with 400 IU a day of vitamin D beginning in the first few days of life.
  • All non-breastfed infants, as well as older children, who are consuming less than one quart per day of vitamin D-fortified formula or milk, should receive a vitamin D supplement of 400 IU a day.
  • Adolescents who do not obtain 400 IU of vitamin D per day through foods should receive a supplement containing that amount.
  • Children with increased risk of vitamin D deficiency, such as those taking certain medications, may need higher doses of vitamin D".

    "Given the growing evidence that adequate vitamin D status during pregnancy is important for fetal development, the AAP also recommends that providers who care for pregnant women consider measuring vitamin D levels in this population".

  • NEW GUIDELINES DOUBLE THE AMOUNT OF RECOMMENDED VITAMIN D
  • Another Study Asks About Association Between Low Vitamin D and Heart Attack