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7/3/08

RED WINE SHOULD YOU OR SHOULDNT YOU LATEST REPORT IN THE SAGA OF RESVERATROL DOES A CHEMICAL IN RED WINE RED GRAPES SLOW DOWN AGING AND A VIDEO

RED WINE SHOULD YOU OR SHOULDNT YOU LATEST REPORT IN THE SAGA OF RESVERATROL DOES A CHEMICAL IN RED WINE RED GRAPES SLOW DOWN AGING


Videos Scientists Examine Resveratrol's Effect on the Genes Might it Slow Aging?

Here is the latest installment in the ongoing saga of resveratrol and red wine should you or shouldn't you? This from the Washington Post, "A key compound in red wine known as resveratrol appears to protect against many of the health ravages associated with growing old, new animal research reveals". Red wine may be much more potent than was thought in slowing down aging. Instead of "let them eat cake" the French are more likely to "let them drink red wine" resulting perhaps in something called the French Paradox where the French allegedly have better heart health despite a diet that may not be the healthiest.





"It's very hard to extrapolate from this finding to comment on the benefits of red wine directly, because red wine has many other compounds besides resveratrol, including ethanol, which have very active biological effects," noted study author Rafael de Cabo, unit chief of the laboratory of experimental gerontology at the National Institute on Aging in Baltimore. But red wine is a good source of resveratrol," he added. "And, in this mouse study, we have shown that this particular compound has very strong positive effects on preventing cardiovascular disease, reducing heart inflammation, keeping bone health in terms of structure and function, and maintaining loco-motor and balance activity. So, if these effects translate into humans, it will have a very good impact on the standard of human health."

Charlie Rose Talks with Dr. Sinlair About Resveratrol Click the arrow to start



"De Cabo conducted the research with David A. Sinclair, of Harvard Medical School. Their team is publishing its findings in the July 3 online issue of Cell Metabolism".

A short video about reseveratrol Click the arrow to start



An article in the NY Times talks about the efforts of scientists to determine if a chemical found in red grapes and red wine called resveratrol can lead to slowing down aging and longer life. And if so does resveratrol work like calorie restriction in extending lifespan?

Resveratrol, a natural compound found in grapes and red wine has previously been shown to extend lifespan in some organisms. Calorie restriction while getting adequate nutrition has been shown in mice as well as primates to extend lifespan at least in some studies. That is to say eating fewer calories while getting good nutrition does seem on average to make animals live longer. "Caloric restriction retards several aspects of the aging process in mammals, including age-related mortality, tumorigenesis, physiological decline and the establishment of age-related transcriptional profiles".

  • Compound in Red Wine Fights Ravages of Age

  • Cancer chemopreventive activity of resveratrol, a natural product derived from grapes

    Scientists are examining resveratrol, the chemical found in red grapes and red wine to see if the effect is consistent and why and how it works. In a report that appears in the online science journal called PLOS One, they say "Our studies suggest that dietary consumption of a low dose of resveratrol partially mimics calorie restriction, and inhibits some aspects of the aging process". "The study is based on dosing mice with resveratrol, an ingredient of some red wines. Some scientists are already taking resveratrol in capsule form, but others believe it is far too early to take the drug, especially using wine as its source, until there is better data on its safety and effectiveness".

    According to the Times article "A critical link in establishing whether or not caloric restriction works the same wonders in people as it does in mice rests on the outcome of two monkey trials. Since rhesus monkeys live for up to 40 years, the trials have taken a long time to show results. Experts said that one of the two trials, being conducted by Dr. Weindruch, was at last showing clear evidence that calorically restricted monkeys were outliving the control animals. But no such effect is apparent in the other trial, being conducted at the National Institutes of Health".

  • New Hints Seen That Red Wine May Slow Aging
  • See Purple Medical Blog Eating Fewer Calories May Lengthen Life
  • A Low Dose of Dietary Resveratrol Partially Mimics Caloric Restriction and Retards Aging Parameters in Mice